MONTSERRAT VOLCANO INFORMATION
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Mild Ash Venting

Starting on 25 June 2010, mild ash venting has been occurring from Soufriere Hills volcano. This is the
first time such activity has been seen since February this year. A light dusting of ashfall has been
experienced in several places across the island. The onset of the ash venting was coincident with
small swarms of volcano tectonic earthquakes that occurred, on 23 and 25 June.

Initial observations by MVO staff showed that venting was taking place from inside the collapse scar, at
about the location of English's crater. An observation flight with the helicopter of 'HMS Manchester' on
Saturday 26 June revealed that the ash venting was also occurring from the southern part of the
crater formed on 11 February.

Audible roaring, associated with the venting was heard from several locations on the island on the
nights of 25 and 26 June.

It is unclear what the significance of this venting is; apart from the short swarms of VT earthquakes on
Friday 25 June, there is no discernable seismicity associated with the venting. It is possible that this
venting is phreatic in nature, related to groundwater interacting with hot material below the surface.
There has been a lot of heavy rainfall experienced recently. However, VT earthquakes are often
associated with the extrusion of lava, and similar activity has been observed just prior to lava
extrusion, such as in 2008.
ERUPTION DETAILS: ONGOING EMISSIONS.  http://www.osei.noaa.gov/Events/Volcano/Montserrat
MONTSERRAT VOLCANO ADVISORY : Activity at the Soufriere Hills Volcano has been low this week.
Picture taken on 30/12/09 at 10:39 am by Sean Henville on
the way to Antigua from St. Kitts looking South at 6,000ft
Picture taken on 09/01/10 at 9:34 am by Sean Henville on the
way to Barbados from Antigua looking West at about 4,000ft
Picture taken on 08/01/10 at 3:07 pm
Picture taken on 08/01/10 at 3:12 pm
15 to 22 October 2010

Activity at the Soufrière Hills Volcano has been low this week.

There have been fifteen rockfall signals, one long-period and three volcano tectonic earthquakes recorded this week.

The average sulphur dioxide measurement on all seven days this week was 373 tons per day, with a maximum of 547 and a minimum of 181
tons per day.

The western side of the lava dome above Gages, immediately west of Chances Peak, remains unstable, undercut and overhanging areas
are visible. The eastern side, above the Tar River Valley, is vertical in places. Pyroclastic flows could occur from these, and other, parts of
the dome without any warning.

The Hazard Level is 3. There is no access to the terrestrial Zone C and daytime transit access to shipping through the maritime extension of
the zone.
29 October to 5 November 2010

Activity at the Soufrière Hills Volcano has been low this week.

There have been seventeen rockfall signals, one long-period and one volcano tectonic earthquake recorded this week.

The average sulphur dioxide measurement on 6 days this week was 240 tons per day, with a maximum of 294 and a minimum of 169 tons per
day.

Cloudy weather has once again prevented good views of the lava dome. The largest pyroclastic flow this week occurred during the early
hours of 5 November. This travelled around 1.5 km down the Gages valley to the west of the volcano. Further pyroclastic flows are likely from
several steep areas of the lava dome.

The Hazard Level is 3. There is no access to the terrestrial Zone C and daytime transit access to shipping through the maritime extension of
the zone.
22 to 29 October 2010

Activity at the Soufrière Hills Volcano has been low this week.

There have been eighteen rockfall signals, one long-period and eight volcano tectonic earthquakes recorded this week.

The average sulphur dioxide measurement on all 7 days this week was 275 tons per day, with a maximum of 376 and a minimum of 171 tons
per day.

Cloudy weather has prevented good views of the lava dome this week. Sporadic rockfalls and pyroclastic flows are likely to occur from
several unstable parts of the dome without any warning. Temperatures of pyroclastic flows deposits in the Trants and Spanish Point region
formed on 11 February 2010 were measured this week, and were up to 120oC at 20 cm depth.

The Hazard Level is 3. There is no access to the terrestrial Zone C and daytime transit access to shipping through the maritime extension of
the zone.
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